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Foray is featured in Columbia Business School Article, "The New Old"

Advances in healthcare and technology mean people expect to live longer, better lives than they might have imagined even three decades ago. What opportunities await in the longevity economy?

Illustrations by Lara Harwood

Illustrations by Lara Harwood

According to the article, by 2030, one in every five residents in the US will be over the age of 65. It’s the first time in the nation’s history that older people are projected to outnumber children. With the average life expectancy now at 78.7 years, there’s a growing need for increased resources to improve our quality of life as we age.

Many experts say that the stigma around aging is quickly disappearing—in part because of entrepreneurs like our co-founder Patricia Kavanagh ‘78. When Dr. Kavanagh started practicing as a neurologist, she noticed that many of her patients would benefit from a walker, but few of them used one, simply out of embarrassment. She then set out to co-found Foray and produce Spring in order to tackle this stigma.

Make sure to check out The New Old for more about the longevity economy and a feature on Dr. Kavanagh and Foray Design.

Read the article here.

PODCAST: Off your Walker? Foray’s Co-Founder Dr. Kavanagh Takes a New Approach to an Old Need

What’s worse than needing help with gait, mobility and balance? Being told you need a walker. No wonder, when the typical walker basically screams “frail elderly,” and is difficult to use as well.

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Neurologist Patricia Kavanagh was struggling to get her patients with Parkinson’s and other movement disorders to use a walker.  So she teamed up with a design and production team to found Foray and create Spring, a modern device that is more functional and stylish.

Listen to the podcast here